Carl Schurz Park Dog Run Schmooze!

Annual Dog Run Schmooze!

Join us at the Dog Run Committee of The Carl Schurz Park Conservancy’s

Annual Dog Run Schmooze to benefit the renovation and upkeep of our dog runs!

Champagne and hors d’oeuvres will be served!

Monday, May 24th, 2010

6:30 – 8:30pm

Furry Friends NOT included in this schmooze

For more information please call Nina Mortellito (212) 828-1858 or email nina@carlschurzparknyc.org

Carl Shurz Park Association Needs Your Help!

The Carl Schurz Park Association Needs Your Help!

This Sunday, March 21st, at 1pm we need some dog run users to come and help spread wood chips in the temporary run while the main run is renovated. Terese from Parks will be there to organize volunteers. Since this run will be used by the small and large dog run people it would be wonderful to have volunteers from both.It shouldn’t take long if we have many helping hands. For more information, please contact Nina

Additionally,the Carl Schurz Park Association is putting together a small team called “Lily’s Carl Schurz Park Friends” to walk in this years Bark For Life. It would be wonderful to have some people and pups join!

University Animal Hospital

(212) 288-8884

354 East 66th Street

New York, NY

10065

Alert: Craigslist Posting threatens to poison NYC Dogs!

Alert: Craigslist Posting threatens to poison NYC dogs!

Many of our clients have contacted us regarding an e-mail going around stating that a Craigslist poster has been threatening to place poison in and around dog runs in Manhattan.

The NYC Department of Parks stated that they were not aware of any serious, credible threats, but as this is such a serious allegation, we felt it was our duty to inform you, and arm you with information on how to keep your pup safe.

Dog Run Safety Tips

1. When entering the dog run, please

2. Be vigilant. Make sure that your dog is not eating anything off the ground, any plants or any treats that do not come directly from you.

3. Do not touch anything suspicious and do not let any dogs near it.

If you suspect that your dog has ingested something harmful, please call us right away. Be on the look out for any of these signs:
  • Loss of appetite
  • Excessive Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of coordination
  • Tremors/seizures
  • Labored breathing
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Non-responsive behavior

Please call us on (212) 288-8884 if you have any questions. Stay Safe!

University Animal Hospital

(212) 288-8884

354 East 66th Street

New York, NY

10065

Alert: Craigslist Posting threatens to poison NYC Dogs!

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Alert: Craigslist Posting threatens to poison NYC dogs!

Many of our clients have contacted us regarding an e-mail going around stating that a Craigslist poster has been threatening to place poison in and around dog runs in Manhattan.

The NYC Department of Parks stated that they were not aware of any serious, credible threats, but as this is such a serious allegation, we felt it was our duty to inform you, and arm you with information on how to keep your pup safe.

Dog Run Safety Tips

1. When entering the dog run, please

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study it carefully BEFORE unleashing your dog.

2. Be vigilant. Make sure that your dog is not eating anything off the ground, any plants or any treats that do not come directly from you.

3. Do not touch anything suspicious and do not let any dogs near it.

 

If you suspect that your dog has ingested something harmful, please call us right away. Be on the look out for any of these signs:
  • Loss of appetite
  • Excessive Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of coordination
  • Tremors/seizures
  • Labored breathing
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Non-responsive behavior

Please call us on (212) 288-8884 if you have any questions. Stay Safe!

University Animal Hospital

(212) 288-8884

354 East 66th Street

New York, NY

10065

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Protect Your Pet From Intestinal Parasites

Protect Your Pet From Intestinal Parasites

Many of you have called in regarding Dr. Oz’s recent segment on Intestinal Parasites.

With all of the statistics concerning intestinal parasites in dogs and cats (over 18% of dogs and cats tested positive for some form of intestinal parasite in the Tri-state area in 2009!), it is natural to have questions about what to do to protect yourself, your pet, and your family.
Many worms are zoonotic, which means that it IS possible for humans to become infected, however, good hygiene, awareness, and vigilant testing and deworming can help to significantly decrease the risk.

What to look for:

Symptoms manifested by pets that are infected with internal parasites can vary, and depend on a pet’s age, nutritional status, parasite load, duration of infestation, etc. One of the most common symptoms of internal parasitism is diarrhea. Other symptoms include poor appetite, lethargy, coughing, and abdominal distention. Some pets don’t show any symptoms while others can become very ill, or even die from their infestation.

How to prevent them:

Because so many pets can have worms and remain asymptomatic, University Animal Hospital recommends regular fecal tests (at least twice a year) for all of our patients,

As a preventative, we strongly urge all parents to keep their pet on a year round Heartworm preventative, such as Sentinel for dogs, which, in addition to preventing heartworm disease, also prevents and controls flea infestations, and protects against intestinal worms. For cats we recommend Revolution to prevent heartworm disease, and for use as a broad spectrum dewormer.

Frontline for dogs and cats is another important part of your pet

February Is Pet Dental Health Month!

February is Pet Dental Health Month!

Receive 10% off your pet’s Dental Health Care in February.

Dental care is more than just a cure for bad breath. Just like people, pets need preventative dental health care to avoid painful problems later in life.

Here are some things to think about while you’re brushing your teeth:

  • More 8 out of 10 dogs, and 7 out of 10 cats show signs of poor dental health by the age of three.
  • Dental problems in pets as in people can lead to pain, tooth loss, and periodontal disease
  • Pets’ oral disease invariably progresses with time, as does people’s, and can result in damage to internal organs, including the heart, liver and kidneys.

Poor dental care affects more than just your pet’s mouth. Bacteria from the mouth can enter the bloodstream and damage your pet’s liver, kidneys, lungs and heart. A proper dental care routine can add 3-5 years to your pet’s life.

Call (212) 288-8884 to schedule ‘s appointment. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Kennel Cough Outbreak in Manhattan!

Cases of Kennel Cough being Reported In Manhattan!

Recently an outbreak of kennel cough, and canine influenza has hit Manhattan. Many boarding facilities, daycare and grooming salons in the area have reported cases of these highly contagious diseases.

Although these diseases are extremely contagious, and potentially deadly, they are preventable by keeping your pet current on his or her vaccines and staying vigilant about your pet’s environment. Even pets who have been vaccinated for Bordetella or Canine Influenza may still be susceptible to other strains of the same disease.

The most common symptom is a dry hacking cough sometimes followed by retching. Many owners describe the cough as having a ‘honking sound.’ A watery nasal discharge may also be present. With mild cases, dogs continue to eat and be alert and active. In more severe cases, the symptoms may progress and include lethargy, fever, lack of appetite, pneumonia, and in very severe cases, even death. The majority of severe cases occur in immunocompromised animals, or young unvaccinated puppies.

University Animal Hospital
(212) 288-8884
354 East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065

Kittens for Adoption!

Bring home a little New Yorker today!

We have two adorable kittens available who are looking for good homes! We have one boy and one girl. The male cat is fixed and both are dewormed,current on boosters, and friendly.

Please call us on (212) 288-8884 for more information or to schedule a time to view these cuties!

University Animal Hospital
(212) 288-8884
354 East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065

Rabies still a concern in Central Park!

NYC Department of Health ALERT!

As we have posted before, there have now been confirmed cases of rabies in raccoons in Manhattan this year. Today the NYC Dept. of Health sent another bulletin reminding us to stay vigilant.

“We have a rabid raccoon issue in the upper Manhattan areas referenced above [Upper East Side, Central Park,Upper West Side & Morningside Park]which apparently is not getting any better, despite the colder weather. “

In 2009, 20 animals have tested positive for rabies in NYC. Please ensure that your pet is up to date on his/her rabies vaccine to ensure their safety, and be on alert while out with your pet.

Please contact the hospital IMMEDIATELY if your pet sustains a bite or if you are not current on your vaccines. More information can be found on the Department of Health’s site

University Animal Hospital
(212) 288-8884
354 East 66th Street
New York, NY 10065

Help University Animal Hospital Go Green!!

Help University Animal Hospital Go Green!!

Please help us conserve resources by allowing your account to go paperless!!

We now offer online access to your medical history and reminders via Pet portal and have been notifying you by e-mail of your upcoming services or reminders due.

If you wish to no longer receive paper reminders from University Animal Hospital, please contact us via e-mail with

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