Air Travel Tips and Information

Air Travel Tips

If traveling with your pet is not an option, let them have a staycation with us. Whether it’s one night, one week, or more, your dog will enjoy our clean and comfortable facilities. We provide supervised and loving care around the clock. While you are away we will closely monitor your pet, ensuring his or her comfort and health. We have a veterinarian on premises 24 hours a day for boarding supervision, and can accommodate special medical boarding requests.

Rain, sunshine, sleet or snow, our kennel attendants walk each dog individually 3 – 5 times per day, just like you would at home. Our expert groomer, Gracia, is also available to give your pets the spa treatment with a full grooming before they go home. Call us today to book your space.

University Animal Hospital

(212) 288-8884

354 East 66th Street

New York, NY

10065

Kennel Cough, Winter, and Rene Russo | University Animal Hospital NYC

Kennel Cough

by Myles Tomczak, Client Services

This winter will never end. I’m calling it now. The cold has come and it isn’t going to leave. HBO’s “Winter is Coming” ad campaign for Game of Thrones wasn’t being facetious. It was a warning we should have taken very seriously (four years ago).

This situation is either some kind of “The Day After Tomorrow” shift in permanence or we’re stuck in some February 2nd time-loop that’ll have us all waking up to “I Got You Babe” by Sonny and Cher every 6am for the next thousand years.

 

Every week I hear the same comments from my fellow New York residents: “It’s supposed to be in the 50s next week!” “They say this is the last snowfall.” My personal favorite was “It can’t last much longer. This is the first day of Spring!” As if our changing climate cares about the dates humans (or Hoo-Mons as dogs call us) chose a long time ago for seasonal transitions.

The reality is that every week this cold has not ended it has gifted us with elevators, streets and trains packed with commuters seemingly incapable of coughing into their sleeves or managing to avoid the impulse to grip the handrails after wiping the discharge from their faces with the palms of their hands. After ten years in this city I’m starting to understand the people I sometimes see wearing face-masks walking down the block toward me.

Seriously, the sales of facial tissue and cough medicine during these months must have executives at Nyquil and Kleenex doing back-flips at the thought of their Quarter 1 2015 numbers.

For the rest of us, however, this mess of dripping noses and sore throats isn’t just a gross visual. It’s the potential for a dreaded infection. The Common Cold, The Flu or The Upper Respiratory Infection all share one thing — they’re awful.

Nobody wants to be sick. Nobody wants to have to miss work or to spend weeks on end “kicking this bug I caught…” looking like Rene Russo in “Outbreak.”

I dodge out of the way of coughing pedestrians passing me on the street like they’re extras from “The Walking Dead,” to avoid a potential illness because missing work is a luxury I can’t afford.

“Get to the point, man! What does this have to do with our canine friends!?”

 

Thing is, they’re not just cute stuffed animals. They’re alive. Just like us they are capable of getting sick. The scary “Upper Respiratory Infection” is just one of the potential dangers. Unfortunately, like with us “Hoo-Mons,” this virus can spread through the air. That makes it an issue for any dog that has even the smallest of interactions with other dogs.

I hear all the reasons from our clients as to why their dog doesn’t need to receive the Kennel Cough vaccine. I’m waiting for someone to suggest it could cause Autism in their dog but nobody has said that — yet.

The excuses range from “my dog doesn’t go to day-care,” to “our groomer comes to the house,”or the most frustrating “we don’t kennel our dog so he doesn’t need the ‘Kennel Cough’ vaccine.” This one is the most maddening because I can’t blame people for being confused. The terminology leads one to believe this is an infection only dangerous for dogs being kenneled but this isn’t the case.

The truth is that even the most minor interaction with another pooch can transmit this infection to your fuzzy child. Even a brief encounter on the city street during a relief walk or a short time in an elevator with an infected dog can lead to transmission.

Kennel Cough (Tracheobronchitis, Bordetellosis, or Bordetella) is basically a highly contagious bacterial infection that often results in a dry hacking cough/retching. Sometimes there’s a watery nasal discharge. When it’s more severe you’ll notice lethargic behavior, lack of appetite and fever. In very severe cases (usually with unvaccinated puppies) even death is possible. Contact us immediately if your pet is exhibiting these symptoms. Treatment is often very effective and most pet owners (myself included – love you, Bebe) have or will experience this at some point in time.

Where does this leave our New York City dogs?

Between growing day-care options, the dog runs and the occasional grooming/boarding appointment our tiny beasts of New York are in a very unique situation. This city is cramped unlike any city in the country and even pets who rarely leave the family home are at great risk for interaction with unfamiliar dogs.

New York City law actually requires any business operating grooming/boarding facilities (such as University Animal Hospital) to provide proof of vaccines for any dog in-house. Should the health department make a surprise inspection (I have been present for this. Twice. It happens.) the facility must prove vaccines are current or they run the risk of being shut down. In the case of Bordetella the vaccine must have been administered in the past six months. This is a good thing. It keeps the dogs from getting sick and it keeps them from spreading the virus to other dogs. That’s a Win/Win in my book.

Outside of New York city this vaccine is often given just once a year. If you’re bi-coastal or you have a vacation home outside of the city you might be surprised at the “Six Month Rule” because your out-of-state veterinarian had previously informed you the vaccine was an annual. It is relevant to note, however, that the actual vials of the vaccine have a “6 month” label attached.

The most effective way to handle Bordetella infection is to avoid having your pet contract it. It’s an oral vaccine (no needle, just drops in the mouth) that takes just a few days to begin protecting. It’s much easier and less expensive than having to treat kennel cough down the road with pricey antibiotics and additional doctor visits. Your furry child will appreciate you for it as well.

The Myth of Cats vs Dogs

by Myles Tomczak, Client Services

A widespread belief among us “humans” is that our canine and feline companions are always at odds with one another. It isn’t an absurd notion. We’ve all seen a dog go “Cujo” when a cat casually saunters by. You may have been present to see a seemingly mild-mannered cat barrel out from underneath the mattress to land a few solid wallops on the snout of an oblivious pooch. Whether it’s animated films, television commercials or even just our own experiences in life the general opinion is that cats and dogs do not get along. Mortal enemies. Destined to play out an age-old battle that would have Tolkien saying “Hey, that’s a little much, guys.” This legendary war has been the subject of at least two Warner Bros. films (unseen by me) as well as countless media depictions. You’d be hard-pressed to find a moment in popular culture in which a set of cats and dogs are cuddly and warm with each other or where their endless battle isn’t referenced. Cats vs dogs is just a widespread acceptance.

 

The cat and dog war has always surprised me. Growing up I saw plenty of households (my own included) in which cats and dogs coexisted in harmony and in the years I’ve spent behind the scenes of the pet-care industry I’ve seen more than my share of instances where this myth of the cat and dog war doesn’t hold much weight. Take, for instance the two fearless house-cats of University Animal Hospital…

corndog Critter_TummyTime

These gorgeous babes have grown up among thousands of dogs and often don’t bat an eyelash when they’re confronted by a Golden Retriever whose head is bigger than both of them (or bigger than Kornflake and half of Krispy Kreme.)

I’m no scientist but being that I have a Master’s Degree in dog/cat psychoanalysis from a University I can’t remember the name of I think this is clearly enough to prove that this belief is outdated and should probably be put to rest. Truthfully, cats and dogs can very easily get along if the right steps are taken to ensure they acclimate to one-another.

No expert would suggest tossing them into a room together to “see what happens” but many would likely advise a slow introduction that allows both to adjust to the change in the normal routine. The key factor to remember is that like “humans,” cats and dogs have their own eccentricities and traits. No two cats or dogs are exactly the same and any change in their regular lifestyle can cause stress or anxiety. Talk to your trainer or the next time you’re meeting with one of our amazing University Animal Hospital staff veterinarians ask how to best introduce any new addition to your household. They’re happy to provide any advice that pertains to your situation.

Despite popular culture’s attempts to sell us this ongoing battle of the beasts the truth is that cats and dogs can be friends if we’re willing to take the time to help them out a bit.

Check out this video that depicts a cat being reunited with his dog friend after a mere ten days apart and tell me that’s not love.

Watch on YouTube: Not Always Archenemies!

Keep Your Pets Safe this Holiday Weekend!

Cases of Kennel Cough being Reported In Manahattan!

Recently an outbreak of kennel cough, and canine influenza has hit Manhattaan. Many boarding facilities, daycare and grooming salons in the area have reported cases of these highly contagious diseases.

Although these diseases are extremely contagious, and potentially deadly, they are preventable by keeping your pet current on his or her vaccines and staying vigilant about your pet’s environment. Even pets who have been vaccinated for Bordetella or Canine Influenza may still be susceptible to other strains of the same disease.

The most common symptom is a dry hacking cough sometimes followed by retching. Many owners describe the cough as having a ‘honking sound.’ A watery nasal discharge may also be present. With mild cases, dogs continue to eat and be alert and active. In more severe cases, the symptoms may progress and include lethargy, fever, lack of appetite, pneumonia, and in very severe cases, even death. The majority of severe cases occur in immunocompromised animals, or young unvaccinated puppies.

Tips to Keep Your Pet Safe in the Winter

It’s official: winter and all of its trappings have arrived. That means snow, ice, and freezing cold temperatures. Just because your pet is covered in fur doesn’t mean they’re comfortable in the cold. In fact, prolonged exposure to extreme temperatures can be just as deadly for pets as it can be for humans. With that in mind, here are a few tips to help keep your pets warm and toasty this winter.

 

Just like a hot car in the summer, a cold car in the winter can be deadly. Never leave your pet alone in a cold car. Save a warm spot off the floor and away from drafts for your pet to sleep at night. For kittens and older cats, try a heated pad or bed. Be sure to keep a close eye on small, short-haired, very young, or very old dogs when they’re out in the cold. When taking them on a walk, keep them warm with a sweater or a doggy coat. Long haired dogs or breeds that tolerate the cold may be better equipped for snow, but they should also still be supervised. Adjust your animal’s food intake based on the amount of exercise he or she is getting in the winter. (You might consider adjusting your own, too.) Matted fur won’t protect your dog or cat from the cold, so keep their coats well groomed. After taking your dog for a walk, wipe down their feet, legs, and stomach area to prevent ingestion of salt or dangerous chemicals. And always use a pet-friendly ice melt product for your own home. Never let dogs off leash on snow or ice. Antifreeze has a sweet taste that attracts animals, but is a deadly poison. Wipe up any antifreeze spills immediately, or better yet, use pet-safe antifrieeze.
Outdoor cats often nap on or around car engines to keep warm. If there are outdoor cats in your neighborhood, honk the horn before starting your car to make sure any cats hiding next to your tires get out safely. If your dog is let out in your yard, make sure snow drifts near your fence haven’t made it easy for your dog to escape. Keep water available for your dog while he’s outside. Use a tip-resistant, ceramic or hard plastic water bowl rather than a metal bowl. If you have questions about caring for your pet during the winter months, please call University Animal Hospital at (212) 288-8884. Our veterinarians and knowledgeable technicians are available to help you and your pet at all times.

Goldfish Has Life Threatening Tumor Removed

A veterinarian in Australia performed micro-surgery on a goldfish, removing a tumor that might have ended the fish’s life. The goldfish, George, was unable to eat or swim with the tumor, and the veterinarian gave the owner the option to remove the tumor or put George to sleep. She chose to have the tumor removed.

The procedure involved putting the fish under general anesthetic. To accomplish this, George was placed in a water bucket heavily laced with the drug until he fell asleep. He was then placed in a second bucket laced with enough anesthetic to keep him asleep during the surgery. With the procedure complete, he was placed in a third bucket with oxygenized water.

George has fully recovered from the surgery. According to his veterinarian, he could live for another 20 years.

Petition Launched To Ban Unattended Animals In Cars

A pet insurance company has launched a petition to encourage legislation prohibiting animals being left unattended in cars. Petplan Insurance posted the petition on We The People, the Obama administration’s petition site. Like all petitions posted to the website, a White House staff member will review it and provide an official response if the petition reaches 100,000 signatures within 30 days.

 

 

The initiative, called “Driven to Bark,” aims to have all states adopt statutes that do not allow pet owners to leave animals unattended in cars. Currently, only 15 states have laws against the practice, which Petplan says causes “countless” deaths every year.

A pet insurance company has launched a petition to encourage legislation prohibiting animals being left unattended in cars.

2012 is almost here! Book your pet’s New Years boarding now!

The holidays are getting closer, and our grooming and boarding spaces are filling up fast!

Bringing your pet with you for vacation? Our USDA Certified Veterinarians can provide international and domestic health certificates.

If traveling with your pet is not an option, let them have a staycation with us. Whether it’s one

Rain, sunshine, sleet or snow, our kennel attendants walk each dog individually 3 – 5 times per day, just like you would at home. Our expert groomer, Gracia, is also available to give your pets the spa treatment with a full grooming before they go home. Call us today to book your space.

University Animal Hospital

(212) 288-8884

354 East 66th Street

New York, NY

10065

Memorial Day is almost here – don’t forget to book your pet’s boarding!

The holidays are getting closer, and our grooming and boarding spaces are filling up fast!

If traveling with your pet is not an option, let them have a staycation with us. Whether it’s one night, one week, or more, your dog will enjoy our clean and comfortable facilities. We provide supervised and loving care around the clock. While you are away we will closely monitor your pet, ensuring his or her comfort and health. We have a veterinarian on premises 24 hours a day for boarding supervision, and can accommodate special medical boarding requests.

Rain, sunshine, sleet or snow, our kennel attendants walk each dog individually 3 – 5 times per day, just like you would at home. Our expert groomer, Gracia, is also available to give your pets the spa treatment with a full grooming before they go home. Call us today to book your space.

University Animal Hospital

(212) 288-8884

354 East 66th Street

New York, NY

10065

Dental Month in June – 10% off!

Dental Month in June – 10% off!

Due to the popularity of our Dental Health Month discount in February, we were not able to accommodate everyone, so we are extending the 10% discount to the entire month of June!

Dental care is more than just a cure for bad breath. Just like people, pets need preventative dental health care to avoid painful problems later in life.

Here are some things to think about while you’re brushing your teeth:

  • More 8 out of 10 dogs, and 7 out of 10 cats show signs of poor dental health by the age of three.
  • Dental problems in pets
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